I can not add to the list in Koeppel & Manners' catalogue (1983), but Prashant Pandya has raised a question over the design motif of the first issue and it occurs to me that as, according to Evans, these were originally recorded in 1889 as postage stamps, they deserve a mention, while the revenue designs are so different from the postal types that comment is called for.

Fig.17
Type 20, 1888, 25 x 31 mm. Perf. 11½. Wove Paper

The central design of all three postal adhesives is a sword, point upward, as found in various designs from other Rajput states and a symbol of their warrior traditions. The first revenues however depict what Mr. Pandya identified as a half moon (Fig.17), which he points out is an Islamic sign hence inappropriate; the rulers, being Gohel Rajputs, claimed descent from the Sun God. The Moslem waxing moon, however should be tilted with cusps to the left depicting the growing of Islam - as in Pakistan's first definitives where De La Rue produced designs the opposite way which were hurriedly replaced. I am not sure that the moon is ever seen, even in Indian latitudes, with points upward, and although the moon is the basis of one Hindu calendar this may be some different astrological symbol - for instance it is one of the recognised sect marks of Hindu followers of Siva, although the Rajpipla rulers were not such.

It is likely the revenues were actually issued earlier than 1888/9 (Forbin dated them to the year before Evans) as they do not look like an innovation of the British-imposed administration of 1887. Perhaps they are the work of the new State press of 1883 mentioned above. They are lithographed and perf 111/2 - slightly variable - which might be from the perforating head mentioned by Peter Röver above for one sheet of the 1 paiso. Face value is EK ÀNO = 1 anna (not the curious '4 pice' of the letter sheet) and the inscription reads in Marathi script SWASTHÀN RÀJ PÌPLÀ / STÀMP Swasthan, an uncommon term which normally means homeland but here it is only used to denote a state). They are found in many colours or shades: Evans recorded orange-red, blue and green; Morley (1910) called them red, green, yellow-green, ultramarine and blue. Forbin (1915) thought they were orange, ultramarine and yellow-green, while K. & M. list eight colours adding brown and orange-brown. Peter Röver understands the three basic colours were intended to distinguish use on receipts in the three currencies then recognised in the State - British, Broach or Baroda Rupees. The red shades appear scarcer, and are not represented in the Tapling collection or my own.

Cat. No.

Denomination

Printing Colour

201
1 anna
Red
202
1 anna
Green
203
1 anna
Yellow Green

204

1 anna

Ultramarine

205

1 anna

Blue

206

1 anna

Orange

207
1 anna
Brown
207 (a)
1 anna
Orange - Brown

Fig.18

Type 22, 1903, 25 x 29 mm.
Perf. 11, Wove Paper
Portrait of Chatrasinhji

In 1903 a portrait design appeared (Fig.18), inscribed MAHÀRÀNÀ SRI CHHATRÀSINJHÌ MAHÀRÀJÀ / SANSTHÀN RÀJPÌPLÀ, with the value as before (Sansthan, the more usual word, really means community or district but here it again denotes a state). In purple on rose, with the same perf, these are typographed. All listed later issues have portraits.

Whatever the reason for the differing symbolism of postal and revenue designs, none of them depicts the State Arms granted in 1877 which are found on later ephemera. They appear on a printed invitation to meet the Governor of Bombay in 1918 (Fig.19), and by 1936 on semi-official envelopes. Collectors of States material will be familiar with the fairly uniform types of crested envelopes, many of which are found in unused accumulations which no doubt came from a printer's archive. It is by no means certain that all of these were actually used by the ruler concerned, as they may have been imaginative 'Arms' designed for sales purposes, but Peter Röver reports that on 1 January 1877 Queen Victoria conferred Coats of Arms on 89 Indian rulers, drawn in London by the College of Arms after consultation with the states concerned.

Cat. No.

Denomination

Printing Colour

Usage Period

221
1 anna
Purple/Rose
20.8.1913
221(a)
1 anna
Purple/Rose, Imperf

 

Fig.19

Fig. 20

Details are recorded in The Princely Armoury (Calcutta, 1877) and the Raja of Rajpipla was so honoured. In non-technical language, the shield is divided into three vertical strips with the central field showing three cannon and the outer ones a sailing ship each side. The precise heraldic significance is unclear. The supporters appear to be men armed with bows and arrows, and the crest resembles at stag. The motto in Hindi script reads REWÀ JÌNE KÀNTHE, referring to the district name Rewa Kantha, and translated by Prashant Pandya as 'At the banks of the River Rewa' (Fig.20).

 

Rajpipla Revenue Stamp
Rajpipla Revenue Stamp
Light Green
Shifted Perf. with dark printing
Type 25, 1930-35, 24X38 mm. Perf. 12., Wove Paper
Portrait of Vijaysinhji

Earliest usage of 1 anna revenue stamps printed with the portrait of Maharaja H H Shri Vijay Sinhji in light green colour on wove paper have been recorded in November 1921. Example having shifted perforation with dark green printing is known. (see image)

 

Cat. No.

Denomination

Printing Colour

Usage Period
251
1 anna
Green
5.11.1921

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rajpipla Revenue Stamp
Rajpipla Revenue Stamp
Red
Die Proof
(Scan Courtesy : Mr. A. M. Mollah)
Type30, 1943, 22X38 mm. Perf. 14, Wove Paper
Portrait of Vijaysinhji

Earliest usage of 1 anna revenue stamps printed with the portrait of Maharaja H H Shri Vijay Sinhji in red colour on wove paper have been recorded in October 1926. Die proof of this stamp is known.

 

 

Cat. No.

Denomination

Printing Colour

Usage Period
301
1 anna
Red
8.10.1926

 

 

 

 

Information about issues other than mentioned above is most welcome from readers.

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